The sly red fox has managed to be very secretive in all my attempts to film it.

The number of times I saw a glimpse of red moving through the undergrowth – it was there, but no image captured.

The poor old fox is a bone of contention – some like it and others not. I see all animals and birds in the same way – they were here before us, and have a right to be in the wild, raising the family like all other creatures.

At the start of each year I plan my aims for the year ahead, and 2015 was no different. The red fox was within the top three I wanted to capture.

At our site we have some woodland near the hide, and on a few occasions I had seen the vixen in the distance but too far away for a photo.

2015 was a good year for the weather around June when the fox has its cubs.

I searched for the perfect spot to attempt to capture the fox images.

The path near the hide has a steep bank running down the left – full of fern bushes and good concealment for the fox. To the right is a very unusual tree with an area around it with exposed roots and dry earth. Perfect.

As the morning sun came up, I arrived at the spot I had chosen.

Settling down, I positioned the camera at the base of the tree. An hour passed with nothing, and then in front of me I noticed something moving and I looked through the lens.

Eye to eye, the little cub looked as if to say ‘what is that looking at me?’ – probably the first and last human it would see.

The little cub tilted it’s head like a puppy does when confused, and I took some images hoping they would be good enough.

As ever, the patience of the photographer and the planning to anticipate the behaviour of the animal paid off.

Red fox cub

It was so amazing to see this little chap standing in front of me, trying to work out what I was.

Next morning it was back to the same place.

Again the cubs came out, but that was the last time I saw them that year.

What a fantastic experience to have been in the presence of fox cubs.